How to store Bananas

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How to store Bananas

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Bananas are a pantry staple in our house either fresh or frozen they are always in our home. We don’t eat them every day although my son would if I let him. We keep them on hand because they are can be used in so many different applications. From eating out of hand to being sliced for toppings on cereal or yogurt, blending into smoothies, baked in to breads or muffins, and frozen for treats or to be used for later there is just so much you can do with them. Here are a few tips on how to store bananas as proper storage can depend greatly on how ripe the bananas is when you buy it and how to plan to use it. Save money and eat well learn how to store bananas.

When Shopping:

If you plan on eating the bananas out of hand look for firm fruit without dark spots or abrasions on the peel. If you will be using them in baking, mashing, freezing or smoothie applications this is not quite as important.

*Note to save even extra money if you do plan to use them for purposes other than eating out of hand look for “red tape” or “discounted bananas” some stores will have a section for overripe but still useful produce sold at a savings so the store can still get rid of some of its inventory. My local store sells overripe bananas for 28 cent a pound compared to the average 69 cents. Theses are perfect for batch baking, as you don’t have to wait for your normal bananas to fully ripen.

 

Storage and Location:

What to do with your bananas at different stages:

  • Green Bananas: are not quite ripe and will keep the longest and ripen slowly at room temperature on the counter. To speed the process, place them in a brown paper bag, add and apple or tomato to the bag to speed the process even further.
  • Yellow Bananas: are perfectly ripe the more yellow you see the riper the banana is. Once bananas are ripe place them in the produce drawer of your refrigerator. Refrigeration slows the ripening process considerably, but does not stop it. The peel will continue to turn brown, but the fruit will stay fresh and firm for 1 to 2 weeks.
  • Small Brown Spotted Bananas: are very ripe and are the sweetest, these are perfect for baking, freezing and smoothie applications.
  • Brown or Black Bananas: If the banana has more brown or black than yellow on the peel then it is overripe and can be still perfectly be used in baking applications.
  • Grey or Dull Bananas: Avoid these as this is a sign that the bananas were refrigerated in the middle of the ripening process which interferes with best flavor production. Chilling partially ripened bananas prevents the fruit from being able to properly ripen even after brought back to room temperature.

 

Keep an eye on it:

Bananas will ripen faster when placed near other ripe fruits and in warmer temperatures.

Take Extra Care:

For best results hang your bananas. Banana trees and hangers allow air to circulate and avoid “resting bruises” on the fruit.

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There are tips that say to wrap the ends of bananas in plastic wrap. I have tested this and although wrapping the ends in plastic both as a whole bunch or individually does slightly slow the ripening process. However, if you ask me it’s simply not worth it. The time it takes and plastic wrap used don’t benefit me enough. My time is more valuable and besides there are so many great things to do with overripe bananas used in baking, smoothies, snacks and freezing. I never worry about having too many bananas on hand. It does work so use what method is best for you.

 

Do you have a favorite way for ideal banana storage? Do you have questions about how to best store a particular ingredient? Let me know, I am happy to help.

 

For more ways to save money you may also enjoy Grocery Shopping on a Budget How to save money without cutting out the foods you love.

Want more like this? Check out How to store Apples.

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